Just like us, dogs can suffer from motion sickness when traveling, and with the holiday season almost within touching distance it’s time to take action.

Dog motion sickness is more common in puppies and young dogs – the main reason being that the ear structure used for balance may not be fully developed. However, in some dogs, motion sickness can continue into old age.

If a dog experiences travel sickness, he or she can quickly connect the car journey with not feeling well, and this can cause stress in the form of panting, wide open eyes and lip licking.

When travelling across Europe, remember that your dog should be microchipped and have a rabies vaccination, and when you are planning the return journey, don’t forget that one to five days before you return to the UK you must visit a local vet.

Jitka Krizova, founder of all-natural dog products www.vitacanis.co.uk, says: “To help dogs enjoy the travelling part of the holiday as much as their owners, it is very important to change his/her association with the vehicle.

“Make sure your dog is facing forward, don’t feed your dog before traveling, or just to a minimum, make frequent stops, offer him/her water and try natural calming products ahead of the journey like our Aromatic Dog Spray Floral, which offers immediate calm and helps dogs to relax.

“When travelling across Europe, remember that your dog should be microchipped and have a rabies vaccination, and when you are planning the return journey, don’t forget that one to five days before you return to the UK you must visit a local vet. The vet will check your dog, scan the microchip, and give him/her a tapeworm tablet. The vet will also sign your dog’s passport.

“If you fail to do this, your dog may face the quarantine or be sent back to the country you have travelled from. So make sure you check the passport, again and again.”

During the main summer months, it goes without saying that dogs shouldn’t be left in cars.

When the temperature outside is 20 degrees celsius, in cars, it is well over 40, and this happens in minutes! As dogs don’t sweat and they regulate their temperature by panting, in small closed space like a car they will run out of fresh air really quickly.

Ahead of any holiday, preparation is, of course, key. To ensure a happy holiday for everyone and every dog, do your research, plan the journey well and consider giving your dog a helping hand to settle any pre-holiday nerves.

This is a guest essay by Jenny Holden, from vitacanis.co.uk. Want to write for us? Visit www.dogstodaymagazine.co.uk/essay-submission or email editorial@dogstodaymagazine.co.uk

Main image by Unsplash.

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