6 reasons to close the Canidrome❌

The Canidrome is the only Greyhound racing track in Asia. It's located in Macau, the only region in China where gambling is legal. But it's a place of horror, fear and pain; an outdated sport run in a place where animals have no rights. At night, the track comes alive in neon lights, and by day, the Greyhounds languish in little more than cells...

The dogs never leave the Canidrome alive

There is no rehoming program - the only track in the world without one. Death, not retirement, is the guaranteed end of these Greyhounds' careers. Around 30 per month are killed - either because they are too old or sick to go on, or they haven't placed in five consecutive races.

A GREYHOUND NAMED BROOKLYN AT THE CANIDROME

A Canidrome Greyhound named Brooklyn, a dog Greyhound welfare group Grey2K USA have been campaigning to get released. Find out more here.

The conditions are brutal

As many as 800 Greyhounds live in the Canidrome's concrete kennels, yet only nine handlers are employed. The kennel's lower floor exists in darkness, and without air-conditioning, the dogs suffer in up to 92% humidity.

CANIDROME GREYHOUNDS STRUGGLE WITH LEADOUTS

Canidrome handlers struggle during a lead-out. Via Grey2K USA

Injuries are rife

The Canidrome was built in 1930, and little renovation has been done since then. A dated track is a dangerous one; the surface is uneven, the bends are narrow.

...But sick and injured dogs keep racing

In December 2015, less than half of the Canidrome's racing Greyhounds were certified as healthy, according to Anima Macau. Dogs can often be seen on the track with open wounds, bandages and limps.

WALKING INJURED DOGS TO RACE AT THE CANDROME

A blue bandage on the leg of a racing Greyhound. Via Grey2K USA

It's a pointless business

The Canidrome no longer makes money; in fact, its annual revenue is outstripped by the neighbouring casinos every four hours. Government tax breaks are keeping this cruel novelty alive.

CANIDROME ENTRANCE SIGN

The Canidrome's unlit entrance way during daylight hours. Via Grey2K USA

Greyhounds are bought in from thousand of miles away

The Canidrome has to rely on an overseas supply for its races; in previous decades, Australian Greyhounds were flown in, until the airline Qantas bowed to public pressure and stopped carrying them in December 2015, making this route more difficult. In March and April this year a new supply chain opened, as a number of Irish Greyhounds were shipped in. It's a horribly stressful and confusing journey for the dogs, particularly with no loving owner to meet them at the other end.

IRISH DOGS (6) UNLOADED IN MACAU PORT (APRIL 15, 2016)

Irish Greyhounds are unloaded at Macau's port in April 2016. Via Grey2K USA

Find out more about how you can join the fight to close the Canidrome in our in-depth article in the July issue, and sign Anima Macau's petition here.

IRISH DOG TWO STONE TADGH (MARCH 2016)

Irish dog Two Stone Tadgh. He is unlikely to ever leave the Canidrome alive. Via Grey2K USA

Thank you to Grey2K USA, Anima Macau and Caged NW for the information and imagery featured in this article. Featured image via Grey2K USA.

4 comments

  1. Debra Valente 17 June, 2016 at 18:47 Reply

    You must stop the racing and killing of Greyhounds. The entire world knows what you are doing and will continue to fight for their lives. You do not care, but everyone who loves Greyhounds do care and will continue this fight to free them.

  2. Eric McDonald 19 June, 2016 at 02:04 Reply

    Despite their acute hunting drive, there certainly are no more gentle a housedog then the Greyhound. Affectionately known as “45 mph couch potatoes, their behavior around the house, unless otherwise distracted, is : “Eat. Drink. Sleep.” Greyhound racing is a barbaric act of human arrogance, and must be stopped immediately.

  3. dhulster 19 June, 2016 at 19:50 Reply

    Close the canidrome les grey s ne sont pas des machines a sous mais des etres vivants
    Et si ils perdent des courses vous allez les bouffer humains pourris dans l ame

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